Can health warnings and packaging policies change behaviour?

Tobacco packaging has become one of the most important channels for communicating with smokers, both for governments via health warnings and tobacco companies through branding. Our work is evaluating the impact of health warnings on packs, as well as the efficacy of “standardized” or “plain” packaging regulations, which restrict logos and brand imagery on packs.

 

Publications

In Press Adverse effects of caffeinated energy drinks among youth and young adults in Canada: A web-based survey. Hammond D, Reid JL, Zukowski S. Canadian Medical Association Journal – Open; In Press. Perceptions of caffeinated drinks among youth and young […]

Health warnings research

More than 60 countries require large pictorial health warnings on cigarette packages. In many countries, tobacco companies continue to issue legal challenges to larger, picture based warnings. Read more about our research.

International Packaging Study

Are there differences in the efficacy of health warnings across countries? Do smokers in China or India respond to images and messages the same was as smokers in the United States or Germany? Is the impact of pack branding the same across these countries?

Slim cigarettes & pack shape

The World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco control recommends that countries prohibit logos and branding on tobacco packages. In 2013, Australia became the first country to implement “plain” or standardized packaging regulation. Read about our contributions to the evidence base.

Standardized or “plain” packaging studies

The World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco control recommends that countries prohibit logos and branding on tobacco packages. In 2013, Australia became the first country to implement “plain” or standardized packaging regulation. Read about our contributions to the evidence base.